Defenestrations


  1. We All Go Through an “Awkward Stage,” and Mine Has Lasted Three DecadesThat is me at age 12. At least I had good skin — if you could see it behind those hideous glasses. That was the first year I’d ever had glasses; I remember. I loved them because I loved being able to see. Before I got them I was unaware that I couldn’t. We assume everyone sees the same things we do, unless we have some reason to believe otherwise. I’ve always found it strange that glasses are associated with “nerds” when their purpose is to correct a sensory deficiency having nothing to do with intelligence or studious habits. I’ve come to the conclusion that glasses are associated with so-called nerds because society labels as “nerdy” those people who actually care enough to want to see things as clearly as possible.
But I digress. They (whoever “they” are) call it an awkward stage, but when was the last time you really felt comfortable in your own skin? When was the last time you weren’t worried about what people saw when they looked at you, and what they would think as a result?
This was my official school picture in 7th grade. At the time (and for many years after) I thought it was hideous. I never wanted anyone to see it.
Looking at it now, I see a pretty girl with nice lips and beautiful skin who could do with a more flattering set of frames and a better haircut. And also, her pupils are huge, dude. I mean, I didn’t drop acid when I was 12, so what’s up with that?
I see a girl who made bad choices later because she didn’t understand how beautiful she was, how much she had to offer, and how precious all of that was. And I see a girl who, in spite of all that, is pretty okay with herself today — purple hair and all.

    We All Go Through an “Awkward Stage,” and Mine Has Lasted Three Decades

    That is me at age 12. At least I had good skin — if you could see it behind those hideous glasses. That was the first year I’d ever had glasses; I remember. I loved them because I loved being able to see. Before I got them I was unaware that I couldn’t. We assume everyone sees the same things we do, unless we have some reason to believe otherwise. I’ve always found it strange that glasses are associated with “nerds” when their purpose is to correct a sensory deficiency having nothing to do with intelligence or studious habits. I’ve come to the conclusion that glasses are associated with so-called nerds because society labels as “nerdy” those people who actually care enough to want to see things as clearly as possible.

    But I digress. They (whoever “they” are) call it an awkward stage, but when was the last time you really felt comfortable in your own skin? When was the last time you weren’t worried about what people saw when they looked at you, and what they would think as a result?

    This was my official school picture in 7th grade. At the time (and for many years after) I thought it was hideous. I never wanted anyone to see it.

    Looking at it now, I see a pretty girl with nice lips and beautiful skin who could do with a more flattering set of frames and a better haircut. And also, her pupils are huge, dude. I mean, I didn’t drop acid when I was 12, so what’s up with that?

    I see a girl who made bad choices later because she didn’t understand how beautiful she was, how much she had to offer, and how precious all of that was. And I see a girl who, in spite of all that, is pretty okay with herself today — purple hair and all.